Website And Google My Business integration For Local Marketing Success

The challenge for many small businesses with a local customer base is how to secure more sales without relying completely on referrals and repeat work. In this post, we discuss one key element of any local business marketing plan – Website and Google my Business integration.

Research shows that 85% of consumers search for local businesses online (source). Worldwide over 80% of all organic website traffic is generated by Google. According to Advanced Web Rankings,  67% of clicks go to the first five listings on Page 1 Google.

So a relevant page1 presence on Google is of increasing importance to any business attempting to secure new customers in their local area. The key word here is relevant, There is no point at all ranking in a high position for search queries that have no relevance to the business

Google My Business And Website Integration

 The first page of search results for any location based business search such as Accountant location or Plumber location tends to be dominated by directories (such as Yell). Worse still, the top of the page is taken up by paid listings, the Google My Business listings and perhaps also a featured snippet.

To rank a small business website above the directories on page 1 can be difficult (and costly). However, a prominent position in the Google my Business listing pack delivers a position near the top of the page with an obvious link to the business website. For many small businesses with websites languishing down on page 2 or below this is a real bonus as the Google my Business listing effectively delivers a page 1 presence for the website. 

So if it is possible to achieve a position towards the top of Page 1 of the search results with an effective Google My Business listing why have a website at all? The two main reasons are credibility and nurture.

What is a prospect going to do when they first find a potential supplier online? If they have any initial interest they are going to check the business out. If there is no website is that going to raise suspicions? Is the business real? Are they a credible supplier?

The information available from a Google my Business listing is limited. It is not possible to deliver the depth of information required for a nurture campaign or to tempt customers to keep coming back for more.

Although testimonials and reviews available on a Google my Business listing are powerful they cannot deliver the same level of credibility as appropriate content published on a regular basis on a website.

Google My Business – An Overview

Any business can claim a free Google My Business listing and significantly increase their chances of appearing near the top of page 1 Google. In fact, a listing for a business may already exist as Google often creates a listing based simply on the information found on the web.

Google usually displays three local businesses (known as the 3 pack) in a panel, with a map, near the top of page 1 of the search results. Which local businesses are included and their relative positions are decided by a Google algorithm. The algorithm is based on many factors including how near the business is to the centre of the location used in the search query.

There is no guarantee a business will always appear in the three pack but it is possible to optimise a listing to ensure it has the best chance of display. The first step should be to claim a Google My Business listing if one already exists (the information pulled into the listing by Google can be incorrect) or to create a new listing.

The Business Website 

A proportion of prospects will find a business and make contact immediately but a much larger proportion are likely to make multiple visits over an extended period of time before making a decision. A Google my Business listing is effective in securing enquiries from those ready to make an immediate decision but it has limitations when it comes to building a longer term relationship.

A website is therefore required to build a profile and content that will engage with prospects and build a relationship over time. Content added to a website on a regular basis that either builds credibility (like case studies) or ads some value to the customer can potentially bring prospects back to the website when they are ready to buy.

The content may be in the form of text, video or graphics the key point is it must develop and change over time. Possible sources of information could be how to guides, before and after videos, industry news and comment and product photography (particularly if it shows product applications). 

There is little doubt every business with a local customer base should make online marketing one of its priorities. A Google local listing is a quick and relatively easy way to quickly obtain a page 1 listing on the search engines. When used in conjunction with a locally optimised website and best practice content and search engine marketing then more sales leads can be expected to follow.

NEWS – Of A Google Update Plus A Short Rant

You may have read some chatter about an update to the Google search algorithms over recent weeks (it was jokingly christened FRED). Bit of a strange one this as Google denied any update had taken place initially but later (sort of) confirmed it.

The update was sometime around 7th / 8th March so if you have noticed a drop in rankings, and more importantly traffic to your site, at or around this date it could be as a result of the update. According to Barry Schwarz, who tracks these things closely the update appears to have targeted poor quality sites populated with more than an average number of Ads.

Now here’s the problem, there may (or may not) have been a major update to the search algorithms that may (or may not) have impacted on the traffic to your site but how do you really know. Was the drop due to the update or one of the other (could be as many as 200) factors that impact on a site position in Google search.

Much of the talk about algorithm updates is irrelevant to the average business website owner. It is best just to ignore the chatter and continue to implement best practice. It may not be quick, but it is safer and much more likely to deliver results in the medium to long term

 

Don’t Underestimate The Value Of Your Small Business Reputation

Compromise your small business reputation just once and it will be almost impossible to recover. Building a consistent, long term small business lead generation process is a marathon not a sprint. It is all too easy to get impatient and inject a pushy sales message or two but to do so can destroy all your hard work up to that point.

Let me give you an example from personal experience. I always set aside time every day to read blogs and articles from authors I have grown to trust over the years. For many months I had regularly read the blog of one company (let’s call them Company X). I was evaluating the company as a potential supplier of a marketing tool and I found their blog informative on a number of marketing issues.

Recently it was obvious Company X had decided to cut down on the resources required to keep their blog up to date and guest posts were more and more common. Given the amount of resources required to run a content marketing process that was understandable, to a point. Unfortunately for them they had not allocated the resources to quality check those blog posts.

On reading the blog one day it was obvious the guest post author had very little actual experience of the subject. He was simply regurgitating the standard information (much of it actually incorrect)  that could be found online. A quick check of his various online profiles and, his website destroyed his credibility further. It left me feeling disappointed and more than a little annoyed that a company I had trusted until then could serve up such rubbish. The damage was done and, as it transpired, irreparable.

When the posts from Company X appear in my blog reader they are now routinely deleted. I could be deleting the best, most relevant information out there. It could be the last piece of the jigsaw that persuades me to buy, it does not matter. As their business reputation is destroyed. they now have no opportunity to even get out of the starting gate, and yes I did buy that marketing tool I mentioned but from their competitor.

Are Company X going to lose sleep over my lost sale, well no but I would bet I am not the only one. A huge amount of effort obviously went into their blog before they tried to take short cuts and lost their quality control. The results of much of that effort, I guess will now dissipate over time.

It can be tempting to cut corners or to slip in a pushy sales message but next time you are tempted think long and hard about the potential damage to your small business reputation and its potential long term impact on sales.

NEWS: Google Local Search Rankings – From Pigeon To Possum

If you have noticed changes in your Google local search rankings recently it may be as a result of a major update to the ranking algorithm in early September 2016.

This is the first major update to the Google local search algorithm since the so called ‘Pigeon’ update of 2014. Early evidence appears to show the update only affects the 3 pack (not organic results) and was intended to take out spam results.

Nicknamed ‘Possum’ the update appears to have impacted on some businesses with multiple offices that the algorithm finds it difficult to distinguish. It also appears to have helped businesses with a location based keywords (City / Town name) that are located outside the city limits and / or more than 10 miles from the centroid.

The full impact of the update is still under review so it is worth keeping an eye on the local search ranking for your business over the coming weeks. Also, watch this space for more news.

Take Your Search Engine Marketing In House – Tips and Advice Part3

In the last in the series of posts on how to take Using content to boost SEOyour search engine marketing in house we cover the importance of producing appropriate content. That is, generating information of benefit to potential customers that engages those customers and builds credibility.

There is a vast amount of information online covering inbound (content) marketing. Most of the discussion either relates to larger businesses, is misleading, or just plain wrong. In this post we discuss specifically how content marketing can deliver benefits for the smaller business and include some resources to read more.

In the first post in the series we outlined the importance of persuading the MAXIMUM number of prospects to take a desired ACTION. We outlined the importance of the website, keyword choice and how to ensure a website page has the best chance of ranking on Google if a prospect searches for a chosen keyword phrase.

In the second post we developed the keywords discussion (it is not as straightforward as it may seem) and introduced the concept of semantic search. We also discussed in some detail the importance of backlinks. In this post we develop the discussion to cover the importance of content and how that content may be used to generate high quality backlinks.

So let’s start with an overview of content and inbound marketing. The concept behind inbound marketing makes perfect sense in principle. It states that prospects have become tired of information being pushed their way via advertising, direct mail and (worse still) telemarketing. When they need a product or service they now tend to do their own research long before engaging with a supplier or service provider.

The principle behind inbound (content) marketing suggests that the best way forward for anycontent markeing ralationship to content business is to deliver useful and engaging content to the prospect that will be found during their research process. When found that information identifies your business as a potential supplier, builds credibility and gently guides the prospect down the path to sale.

More detail may be found in the following resources:

What is content marketing – From CMI

The benefits of content marketing – From MarketingTech()

There are three further major advantages of building a number of information resources (content) and posting them to your website.

  1. It builds your base of keywords significantly.
  2. It raises the profile of your site on Google.
  3. Content may be used to build backlinks.

Building Your Keyword Base

The standard SEO advice states that each page of your website should be optimised around a single keyword. With the more recent impact of semantic search it is now possible to also rank for derivatives of that keyword phrase but with only a limited number of website pages the number of keywords is severely limited.

Now try to get inside the head of your prospects. Are they likely to search for the keyword chosen for your website pages or are they more likely to search for information and/or answers? How do you add those answer type keywords to your website? The answer is to develop blog posts, video, slideshare and other content written around their own keyword phrase that will rank in their own right on Google. The following resource gives more details:

A keyword driven approach to content marketing

How Content Marketing Boosts SEO

Increased Profile On Google

There are many elements that determine your websites rank on Google and most have already been mentioned in this series of posts but there is no substitute for publishing quality content on a regular basis.

This guide gives a short and punchy guide on the basics.

If new information (content) is added to your website regularly and that information is interlinked appropriately with other information on your site that will be recognised as a positive ranking factor by Google, and the other search engines.

Build Backlinks

In post 2 we talked about the importance of backlinks in some detail. There are many legitimate ways to build backlinks but using quality content is one of the most effective. Why? Because links generated to quality content are likely to be highly relevant to your website and that is important. The following resources provide more background on the issue.

How content marketing boosts SEO

This excellent guide from Cory Collins

Unfortunately, much online commentary glosses over the issue of how to build these backlinks. Most seem to focus on the ‘build it and they will come strategy’, which is complete nonsense.

The first step is to take a long hard look at your content and decide if it is likely to be something someone else may link to. If it is linkable the next step is to establish who may link to it and why; then reach out to them and suggest your content without being pushy.

This is a far from simple process that requires time and effort. One method is to type your contents keyword phrase into Google, look at the other similar content on page one and two of the search results, research who has linked to them and use this information to build a list of who to approach. This post from SEMRush may help.

Types of content 

Content may take many forms. For a tradesman it may simply be some before and after photography of a job well done but there are many other types of content including:

  • Formal case studies
  • Blog posts
  • Videos (How to…, Before and after)
  • Slideshares
  • Testimonials
  • Photography

The trick is to choose the content that has the best chance of engaging the required prospects and leading them down the point to sale. However, building the content is only part of the battle as, once built, the content needs to be distributed to the point it has the best chance of being found. This is a major topic that is covered in detail in our free in house search engine marketing guide.

Word of mouth recommendation may remain the most effective marketing tool for any small business trying to attract more customers in a specific geographic area but once that recommendation has been made it is likely the prospect will check out the business online. They will expect to find the company website relatively easily and once there will seek confirmation that the business is credible and can deliver the required product or service. When created and utilized correctly content delivers on both objectives.

 

Think Before Investing In A New Small Business Website

When trying to take your business to the next level don’t believe all you need is a new small business website and the customers will flood in. As a stand-alone item a new (or updated) website can be a complete waste of time and money.Small business website design is not enough

If you think it through the new business website pitch is fundamentally flawed. It assumes your potential customers will naturally find the website when they search for your products or services. It assumes all your prospects are using a traditional search engine. It ignores the power of word of mouth.

A website has a role but it is important to establish the small business marketing process before designing the website as any mismatch will simply waste time, resources and (worse still) your hard earned cash.

How many website visitors do you actually need to achieve your goals and from what geographic areas? For many websites <2% first time visitors actually convert to customers.

It is often worth taking a step back and really thinking through what it is you offer, what sets you apart, what type of customer you want to attract, how many of those customers you need and, finally, how you are going to attract them to your business. What is your marketing process?

If a website has a role in the marketing mix then a proportion of the funds available need to be kept back to work on activities that ensure it is found. Research from Chitika shows >90% of searchers on Google never go beyond page 1 of the search results.

It is important to research your customers, their information needs and where they look for that information. How are they likely to search and what search phrases are they likely to use. If target prospects are all within the local area a Google My Business may be all that is required instead of investing in a website.

Even then the battle is not over as there is so much misinformation peddled on how to ensure your website is found in search that it is too easy to waste even more cash on poor quality search engine marketing companies that fail to deliver results.

A well thought out new small business website that fits within a robust marketing process can without doubt pay for itself many times over. However, it is important to remember that on its own it is unlikely to deliver the required result for most small businesses.

Related posts you may like:

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Google+ Local Vs Google My Business

Have you heard about Google my Business and are you worried about what impact it may have on your existing Google+ Local listing? In short, there is no major need for concern but if you want to know more about Google my business vs Google + Local and the advantages (and disadvantages) of one over the other then read on.

The history behind the changes of Google places to Google+ local to Google my business is long and complex. If you want the detail it is available in this excellent post from WrightIMC so I don’t intend to cover it here. All I cover are the key features of Google my business and how it differs from Google+ Local.

For any business with a local customer base Google My Business is a powerful promotional tool. You can read more about its benefits here but in summary it offers:

– A presence on Page 1 Google (location based).

– A products and services showcase.

– Increased credibility.

Often a small local business can dispense with the need for a business website altogether. All they need is a Google My Business page.

The major change is to the dashboard. It is now much easier to update the primary company contact information. The addition of an Insight, Reviews, Analytics, You Tube and Adwords box delivers all key data in one place.

The new Insights box allows you to track engagement with your Google My Business page by visibility, engagement and audience in some detail. However, the reviews box is perhaps even more powerful for any business with a local customer base. Reviews and testimonials are a powerful promotional tool when trying to distinguish a business from the competition in a crowded marketplace.

The reviews box shows you your Google reviews and where other reviews for your business have originated from around the web. The analytics show the number of reviews and (crucially) the average rating on Google. Potential customers may quickly use this rating to check your business against the competition in the 7 pack. It is also thought to influence Google on their decision to display your listing (or not)

The other boxes are optional to an extent. If enabled, the key stats from the Google Analytics account attached to your website will display in the analytics box. The stats from your You Tube account, if enabled, will show in the next box, followed by the key stats from the Adwords account associated with your website, if you have one.

The move to Google Your Business then has simply tidied up some of the long standing mess associated with the move from Google Places to Google+ local and delivered a more user friendly dashboard. The long standing benefits of a Google My Business account to small business with a local customer base remains unchanged.

Take Your Search Engine Marketing In House – Tips and Advice Part2

In our previous post on taking your search engine marketing in house we discussed strategy, on site SEO (including Meta tags) and the importance of keywords. We also provided a list of resources to help you get started. In this post we expand on the keyword discussion and discuss the importance of backlinks. This topic is closely related to content that will be discussed in the last post in the series (coming soon). So on with the show.

Keywords in SEO – What’s changed?

In our last post we discussed the importance of keywords (or more to the point keyword phrases) and the allocation of one phrase per page. We also introduced some keyword research tools. Although it is first important to understand the basics it is no longer quite as simple and search has moved on.

Two years or more ago the single keyword (or phrase) per page was enough to rank well but no more. The Google algorithm now takes a more sophisticated approach to deciding what a page is about and ranking it accordingly. This topic can become highly technical but this excellent post from Cyrus Shepard gives a simplified overview of what is required.

The Google algorithm now looks beyond the keyword phrase to consider related words distributed through the page text, related concepts and synonyms. Position of words and phrases and their interrelationship are also important.

The Importance Of Backlinks

At this point I could go off at a tangent and rant about the amount of hogwash that is published online about backlinks but I will restrain myself. Suffice to say (to paraphrase Mark Twain) reports about the death of backlinks are greatly exaggerated. How Google interprets backlinks has changed (to a point) but that is all.

A backlink is a link from another webpage to your website. They come in two variants follow and no follow. It is generally accepted that the follow variants are the most important when the Google algorithm is deciding how to rank a site but nofollow links also have some relevance (how much relevance is a subject of some debate). Google has long taken the view if a web page links to your website it must consider the content of value and therefore that website deserves a higher rank.

Backlinks remain of critical importance to how Google ranks a website online. Yes content is important (see next post), yes onsite factors like site speed are important, yes keywords are important but without quality backlinks a website is not going to rank well.

It appears Google may be intent on devaluing the backlink element in their algorithm but it will take time. Remember Google has relied on backlinks as a key ranking factor in their algorithms for many years and even Google, with all their resources, cannot change tack overnight.

Millions of words have been written about bad quality backlinks and the Penguin and Panda Google algorithm changes designed to penalise sites that had high numbers of bad links. A bad link is one that is unnatural, it has been automated in some way and not earned. Bad links should be avoided at all costs, relevance and quality of the link are now key.

How To Earn Quality Backlinks

There is no substitute for experience and no quick fix as quality link building takes time to learn and is a resource intensive activity. One route is to earn quality backlinks using valuable and engaging content (covered in next post) but that takes time and considerable effort. To cover all the possible link earning opportunities would take a whole series of posts to so below are some options with resources to read more.

One important point to keep in mind when reading back linking information on line is this quote from Michael Martinez ‘Stop taking link building ideas from SEO websites. It should be obvious by now that if you read about a great linking idea or resource on a forum or blog it will be quickly crushed and devalued by overuse.’ Be careful with what you read.

Some methods to consider

  1. Raid your competitors’ links: Check out how your competitors have built their link profile and try to utilize the same route. This document from Robbie Richards .
  2. Find dead links and replace them with your content. In my humble opinion this is one that falls into the overuse category (see above) but read more in this guide from Greenlane
  3. Contribute to and drop links in relevant Forums. This tactic was overused in the past and has become associated with bad links but is still valuable if used correctly
  4. Answer questions – Sites like Quora are a good place to start. This guide from Kelsey Jones may help

There are several more but they are more associated with content and are covered in the next post on content and its importance to SEO – coming soon.

4 Small business Marketing Myths

There are many small business marketing myths that continue to be peddled online. Perhaps the myths are simply perpetuated by those who know no better. Or it could be more sinister and based on vested interest. Whatever the reason any small business falling for the hype is likely to end up out of pocket for no real return.

Myth1 – All I Need Is a Business Website!

Many businesses believe that all they really need for the enquiries to roll in is a professional business website. While there is certainly a credibility issue if a prospect types in the business name and no website is found investing in a new website build is not necessarily the best use of resources.

The questions to ask are:

  • How much of my business comes from existing customers?
  • How much existing customer business will I lose if there is no website?
  • Can I expect to obtain more business from existing customers if a website is in place?

With these answers in hand you can now turn your attention to new customers. Is it likely those prospects will be searching for your product or services online? As the answer will almost certainly be yes then how many website visitors do you need to secure a sale and what is the value of that sale? It is important to research these figures to establish how much can be invested in the website build and in making sure the website is found by target prospects.

To secure new customers via a website assumes those prospects can find the website. Statistics shows >85% of website searchers never go beyond page 1 of search to satisfy their information requirements. While these statistics can be misleading there is little doubt if a website cannot be found it is a waste of time and money.

Myth2 – I Need To Be On Page 1 Of Google!

Small businesses probably waste more on search engine optimisation than any other marketing activity. Yes a website needs to be on page 1 but that is only relevant if it is based on a relevant keyword search. Which search words or phrases (keywords) are prospects most likely to use and how common is that phrase (traffic) is a key consideration.

For a very specific keyword phrase a website may rank on Page 1 without any difficulty but does that keyword phrase (and its immediate derivatives) actually bring any traffic (prospects) to the site? Single keywords and phrases are less relevant to search than they once were and ranking on a single phrase is now of little use.

At least one post (probably more) is realistically needed to cover what follows but for now a quick, but important, summary will suffice. There are two major SEO myths to be aware of. The first states that backlinks (websites linking to your site) are no longer relevant. The second states that all you need is lots of relevant and engaging content on your site for it to rank high on the search engines. Both, taken in isolation, are utter rubbish.

Content is important, so are backlinks but to use one in isolation will not work. What is needed is both high quality backlinks and engaging content as part of a search engine optimisation process. Content then needs to be distributed appropriately to drive both visitors and high quality links.

Myth3 – Mobile Marketing Is The Way Forward!

In principle yes, there are lots of statistics to show that search traffic is moving away from desktop and towards mobile telephone and tablet but that is only part of the story.

A recent post from Graham Jones perhaps illustrates one of the major issues. We all tend to segregate our activities so the relevance of mobile is very much dependant on the product. Using mobile marketing inappropriately can quickly alienate a potential prospect base.

A quick look at Google analytics will show the relevance of mobile to your site. Click on the browser tab on the left and take a look at the percentage of current traffic coming from Safari and Android. Then ask around among your customers to establish what they use to browse to your website and why. This is far from perfect science but it does give an indication of the relevance of mobile (or not) to your business.

Myth4 – I Need To Be on Facebook!

Well yes if your customers are there and they are using Facebook to research your type of products or services then it makes sense. On the flip side for many businesses their customers are simply not there or they are not active users.

It is also important to remember the segregation issue mentioned above. Many use Facebook and the other social networks for social activities (there’s a surprise!) like keeping up with friends or gossip and not for business. Often, finding business information when in social mode is a real turn off and creates a negative impression of the business.

There is a common theme to all of the above and that is there is little point using any marketing technique that does not reach your target market. What do I sell, who needs that product or service, how do they decide on a supplier and how do I reach them are the key considerations. The marketing tools or techniques are secondary.

It is the big picture and process that matters, not the hype over the latest and greatest marketing technique or the small business marketing myths perpetrated by those who simply need to sell a product or service regardless of the ROI.

Related Posts You May like:

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How Much Should A New Website Cost

As may be expected the answer to the question of how much should a new website cost is not straightforward and depends on a number of factors. That said, we will try to deliver best estimates based on the website platform and the level of website complexity.

Before we get into the detail perhaps we can save you some money? It may be you do not need a website at all? Before deciding on a new website, technology, design, layouts, costs and potential suppliers there are several important issues to consider.

Think About Your Strategy

It is important to re-visit your business plan to ensure that whatever you create fits with that plan and delivers on your business objectives. What are your key messages? Prospects are not generally interested in ‘welcome to our website’ statements or a company history. They want you to get to the point, in plain language, and to do it in as few words as possible.

What Do You Hope The Website Will Achieve

What would you like your website to achieve? Do you want a brochure site that builds authority and your brand or is your prime objective to obtain quality leads for your sales department to chase down? Try not to get caught somewhere between the two and make a firm decision on one or the other.

A Website May Not Be The Best Option

Really think about your business, what you want to achieve and the other options available before investing in a website. For example if you are a local plumber it may be far better to have a strong Google Local listing than try to compete for a spot on page 1 Google with the nationals, the major directories and those prepared to invest heavily in SEO.

Remember To Keep something back for SEO (or PPC)

On the subject of SEO remember a website is of little use if it cannot be found when a prospect types a relevant search phrase into a search engine. To compete for that all important page 1 position then something will have to be spent on SEO or PPC.

Do As Much As You Can In House

Both to keep costs down and to ensure there are no misunderstanding it is worthwhile spending some time thinking about the keywords that best describe your business. What is a prospect likely to type into a search engine when searching for your goods or services?

Write out key statements and think about the information that absolutely has to be on your website and how it all links together. Collect relevant photography you own or source stock photography (making sure you do not breach copy write) that you would like on your site.

Build A Solid Brief For Your Website Supplier

The above maximises the chances that misunderstandings will be avoided and that your website designer delivers a website that covers your key messages, it also minimises costs. Although design is important it is essential to make it clear up front that the design should not slow the site down or detract from the message and objectives.

It should be made clear that any website delivered must be SEO friendly and fully updateable via a robust (and simple) content management system (CMS). Check your website supplier carefully, it is best to avoid one man bands who may well go out of business or move on causing you a problem if there are any technical issues or major changes required.

What Should A Website Cost

As a rough guideline a simple website build on the WordPress platform is more than adequate for most small businesses and should cost anywhere between GBP(£) 400 and (£)700. For more complex requirements or simple e-commerce sites this may rise to between GBP(£)1,000 and (£)2,000.

The two other most common website build technologies are Drupal and Joomla. These tend to lend themselves to more complex websites, with more functionality than WordPress but tend to be more expensive as a result. For a simple website be prepared to pay in excess of £750 with more complex designs costing up to GBP(£) 5,000, sometimes more, for special functionality.

There are also many, so called, website builder packages available from Yell, 1&1 and many others. These may appear cheap options but nowhere is it more true that you get what you pay for. If you would like your business website to look almost exactly the same as many others and you don’t mind becoming frustrated with what you can, and cannot, achieve then go ahead.

Thinking through your objectives and preparing properly can save you an awful lot of time and money in your website design process. It can also lead you to the point you may have a reasoned conversation with your website design company on what the best build package and cost level may be best for you.

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